Loosely on the US Healthcare Reform

Possibly part one of many.

Today is the day of Obama’s Healthcare reform. I’m celebrating this, hoping it will be passed, by looking back on an old blog post from my days at Blogger.com.

I was reacting to a video by The Resident:

– and was writing on the wellfare state model we have over here (the universal wellfare state model), also mentioning the healthcare:

[…]

We also have free healthcare; visits at the doctor and the hospitals are for free.

[…]

Imagine having all of this as a US citizen. The security it is to have. Yes, [citizens/residents of Denmark] pay a shitload in taxes (approximately 35 – 60 %, all depending on your income) – but we don’t have to worry about spending money on healthcare and tuition fees. And if you wonder about how little things cost in Denmark if we can afford living with such taxes: Our minimum wage is just above 100 kr. (€13/£10/$20) per hour – as far as I remember, the US minimum wage is around $7-8.

Either way, someone is going to pay for the hospital visit. Pay the doc. Pay the school. Support the unemployed, students, sick, and elderly (if they are being supported, that is – because they may not be!). So why not do it through taxes and get it overwith already?

You may not have a kid to put through school, but don’t you think another kid could benefit from that?
You may drink a lot of milk and have strong bones (well done!), but don’t you think that someone with osteoporosis could benifit from that?
You may be physically strong/healthy, but don’t you think someone with cancer or a weak heart could benifit from that?
You may be an unfertil man, but don’t you think a pregnant woman could benifit from that?
Your parents may have saved for their retirement while they could (or passed on to a better place), but don’t you think someone who has been forced to retire early or had too little money or otherwise have been unable to save could benifit from that?

I’m not saying that it should be put directly into work in the US – it took us two World Wars to decide to get the point, and we have a significally longer history than the US as a nation – but it would be nice to see some baby steps towards something similar in the US.

Obama promised change, and I do hope some of these baby steps are included when the financial crisis is over and done with.

I’m still hoping for change like this – not only for the weakest – but for all, for equality in the US.

The original post can be found right here.

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Christianity and Socialism

This is one of those entries where I just vent and rant out of frustration, getting all hotheaded. Of course, I do understand that one can feel slightly stupid when working one’s butt off, only to risk having 60 % of one’s personal earnings taken away (the basic rates were – at least until Dec. 31st, 2009 – app. 35-40 %, depending on the municipality of your residence; additional rates are put into work if you earn a higher amount of money).
Still, knowing that it could save the weakest in society, that I can save someone’s day/education/basic economy/life/etc. (also referring to the blog entry I mention in the end of this one), I’m okay with it. I’m aware that some individuals may take advantage of it, but still – they don’t represent the rest of the lot.

Btw, Graham – I think it’s an amazing step you’re taking. Amazing, awesome, and admirable. Congratulations to the both of you!

Christianity and Socialism
Written in post-Christmas December, 2009.

Yet again, the darling Graham has sent me right up on my soapbox (or just right back behind the keyboard of my computer, quickly entering my dashboard, and adding a new post) with an entry on family matters.
Yes, I have been inspired to write a blog entry by one of his earlier entries, but reading another of his entries had me pausing, thinking for a moment (yup, I’m easily distracted every now and then. But, Graham, Canada?! Wowsies!!!), and the entry ended up as a draft only. It may just be reviewed, polished, and presented on a later occasion (but don’t hold your breath – at least breathe while you stock up on canned goods).

Let me just start with saying that I generally agree with Graham on family/friendly matters; he just reminded me of my opinion on Christianity and socialism – and the handful of reactions from the US I’ve seen on TV. I just started writing in the Comment box, and in the end it seemed to me to be more of a blog entry for my own blog rather than a comment for Graham.

I remember watching something on TV – a sort of news story or somesuch – about a family from the US. It was connected to President Obama and the health care reform.

Not specifically in that news story, but in news from the US in general, socialism seems to be a bad word in the US; something created by the Devil – only one thing seems to be worse (to those it’s not equal to): Communism.

The specific news story in question showed a married couple – I think with one or two children – who were opposed to public health care. They and their children were all covered through their places of work, so they had no need for anything public (apparently). A useful fact for the following is that they are Christians and attending a local church.

They were asked what would one should do if one wasn’t as fortunate as them and couldn’t afford health care. Their answer? They should go to their church for help.

And my reaction? Heck yeah, I got pissed. How about those not being Christian? Not attending church? Not being ABLE to go? Don’t they deserve to be taken care of?

I live in a society based on socialism/social democracy/reformism, and being born and raised here with a universal welfare state, I’m used to high taxes – and through that the right to receive free health care, free education, to receive student grants never to be paid back, to receive social security, pension, etc. from the State, paid through the beforementioned high taxes, no matter my religious and ethnic background, skintone, etc.

Being a Christian, raised by Socialists, listening to sermons about “loving thy neighbor” (and may I just add: “as thyself”!), and having a Reverend (the very Rev from Brorson’s ChurchChurch Sanctuary and all that) re-telling the Parable of the Good Samaritan whenever he gets the chance, it’s beyond me how Christians can’t approve of money being redestributed through a universal welfare state, making sure that everybody are “home” safe.

Yes, I’m a socialist – and I believe that since a country asks people to be legal, good, responsible citizens with legal passports and various other official ID (varying from country to country), paying taxes, the country also has a responsibility to keep its citizens safe; even going as far as to get them home if something serious (illness, harm) happens to them abroad (yes, this USED to be a part of the package in my country).

*sigh* If I didn’t get all of my bitterness out right here, an old blogpost may be dusted off and republished right here on this very blog. Nope, this subject never gets old to me.