Music Monday #5: Love Parade Tragedy

On Music Monday this week:
1. Introduction
2. Favorite Listings
3. Top 5 Most Played Songs on Music Player
4. Drop me a line.

Usually I’m not too fond of too much techno/dance music at once (although with some exceptions) – but I think the events in Duisberg over the weekend deserve some attention. Yet again, I’m postponing the already promised post on classical and hiphop/R’n’B – and also a spark of inspiration from Friday to do a Josh Groban theme. So sorry if you’re disappointed, but this is how it is!

DR Nyheder: Aldrig mere Love Parade
DR Nyheder: Dødstallet i Duisburg er steget til 20

BBC News: Stampede at German Love Parade kills 19
BBC News: Germany’s Love Parade discontinued out of respect

CNN: 18 killed amid panic at Germany’s ‘Love Parade’
CNN: Number of dead, injured at German music festival rises
CNN: After deaths, German music fest won’t continue
CNN: Merkel orders ‘intensive’ investigation into festival stampede

19 20 dead. At least 342 injured. One festival less in the future.

My thoughts go out to everybody affected by this.

Go here to sign the book of condolences.

As I said (or at least tried to express earlier), I’m not too good at techno/dance. But here are a few of my fave dancables with an inhumanly steady groove:

Five For Comemorating
Tiësto: “In My Memory” (watch/listen @ YouTube)
— “Face me, sitting in my memory/Hold me, I remember […] I feel uneasy, under this thing/Thoughts away/The heavenly” – I’ll let the lyrics speak for themselves. Tiësto performed during the Love Parade.

Röyksopp: “What Else Is There? (Trentemøller Remix)” (watch/listen @ YouTube)
— I’ll let the lyrics speak for themselves.
I remember this one from the start of my studying for my higher preporatory exam (HF/secondary school/high school); we were planning on making an acoustic version of it in the extracurricular music class, but never made it that far.

Fatboy Slim: “Right Here, Right Now” (watch/listen @ YouTube)
— as in: There is nothing like the present when standing in an overcrowded crowd.
I still remember Fatboy Slim from my days of next to constant MTV, and later on the Roskilde Festival. A handful of tracks of the Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars album was considered for this entry – among them “Drop the Hate” (… Aw, heck: watch/listen @ YouTube. Drop the hate, forgive each other!).

Basshunter & DJ Mental Theo’s Bazzheadz: “Now You’re Gone” (watch/listen @ YouTube)
— …
Found by neat cooperation between vague memory and checking up on Sash!, having forgotten Basshunter’s name completely, but remembering “Boten Anna”. I was certain that I had known another version of “Boten Anna”, a version I thought I had heard before “Boten”, but… *sigh*… Admittedly, I must have heard the commercial for Crazy Frog before any other version – “Now You’re Gone” came after, as far as I’m informed by now.

Sash!: “Adelante” (watch/listen @ YouTube)
— “Porque la vida es corta.”
Again, doin’ some diggin’ from my MTV-days of the late 1990s.

The Top 5 most played on my portable music player is as of right now:
1. “Slow Me Down” (Emmy Rossum)
2. “Teardrop (LP Version)” (Massive Attack)
3. “Come Around” (Timbaland feat. Mia)
4. “Stay” (Emmy Rossum)
5. “Give It To Me” (Timbaland feat. Nelly Furtado & Justin Timberlake)

Got any reactions? Suggestions? Requests? Comment/reply away!

“Let’s Eat Grandma!”

Well, that’s what I though of when reading a couple of blogposts today. It’s taken from a page that I “like” on Facebook: ‘Let’s eat Grandma!’ or, ‘Let’s eat, Grandma!’ Punctuation saves lives. Yes, I also “like” The correct usage of “You’re”, “Your”, “There”, “Their” and “They’re”, just like I probably would click the “Like” button of I find a fanpage on the correct usage of “new”/“knew”, “right”/“rite”/“write”, “where”/“were”/“we’re”, “its”/“it’s”, “sue”/“sew”, and “to”/“too”/“two”/“2”. And yes, I also think that people legal age and up still using an eloquent text speak should grow the fuck up – YOU LEARNED HOW TO SPELL IN PRIMARY SCHOOL! (*cough* pardon me my French and high volume).

Just for the sake of it, I think I should mention that primary school up here includes the 9th and the optional 10th form, and that part of the tests when concluding this is dictation; it’s one of the five compulsory tests (at least when I finished the 9th form back in 1999). You would think that somewhere in between nine and 11 years of school, depending on whether or not you’re taking preschool and/or the 10th form, would equip you to spell correctly, right?
Oh, and did I mention that English isn’t my first language? All things considered, I believe it’s my third (unless we’re talking formal classes – then it’s my second. In that case I should know Latin, too, but that’s not the entire truth).

This is why I agree with many commenters of the SciFi/SyFy Channel post that it’s frustrating and demeaning that SciFi should be spelled SyFy because some big-shot thinks it will attract more people. Frustrating because it alienates the actual core viewers, demeaning because it seems that others wouldn’t know how to spell “science fiction” or its abbrevation to save their lives (at least in the eyes of those responsible of the name change). Either you’re a nerd/geek (supposedly) or you don’t know how to spell.

Honestly, I don’t consider myself a nerd/geek in the world of science fiction (for my non-Christian/atheist friends/acquintances/readers: stop giggling – I call upon my constitutional right to have as many “invisible friends” as I want to), but I do believe that I know how to spell. In six different languages (some with dialects/accents), even. If I don’t know or am insecure of the spelling of a word, I’m usually able to deliver a qualified guess (in up to nine different languages, I dare say). I do enjoy my occasional fix of Star Trek: The Next Generation (or should I just say ST:TNG), but I feel that the joke is on me if I have to go to a channel calling itself SyFy to get that fix. Actually, as it’s spelled out, the litteral meaning of it in my language is a no-go within sewing!

Anyway. While reading the comments, I came across a link to another post about taking nicknames or common abbrevations as the official name. Well, I don’t think that’s necessary, either! The story about YMCA officially becoming The Y seems off to me as it’s an abbrevation of an abbrevation! Just like the abbrevation KFC would be meaningless without the full name – Kentucky Fried Chicken (nope, the Chicken isn’t Kitchen Fresh!).
Just to illustrate it (albeit with an extreme example), I’d like to quote the Danish comedian Thomas Hartmann in the role of the (eco)stoned hippie, Buller: “Your real name isn’t what you’re nicknamed. If that was the case, my mom’s real name would be Fat Bitch.”

Coming to the article about the people protesting against how the English language is spelled, I see their point and partially agree on Eddie Izzard’s “that’s trying to cheat at scrabble”. Still, I’m not sure that that is necessarily the reason why there’s such a huge part of the American population who have trouble learning to read, write, and spell.
To be frank, I know I wasn’t in the back of the line when it came to linguistic talent/intelligence. Yet I can’t help but thinking that if I am able to juggle two handfuls of living, non-fictional languages (with dialects, silent letters, and odd spellings and pronounciations) the way I can, then why is it so difficult for natives to handle what may be the most popular dialect of such a common language as their one and only language? And speaking of sewing – should sewing or sueing have the right to be spelled sooing?

Knowing a language and appreciating the crowd you already have seems like such simple and easy things to do in my optics. Not that you have to be able to speak Shakespearean English, quote the King James Version when quoting the Bible, actually UNDERSTANDING the KJV (there are other more understandable versions), or settle for a crowd that isn’t there – but if you’re able to communicate, be it with white trash trailer park lingo or in Old English, and if you have a crowd big enough for everything to go splendidly, then why not concentrate on developing on that basis?

Well, that’s just me thinking out loud. Thank you for reading.

Sources
Deepwell Bridge: A Nerd-Rage Rant! Subject: Spelling lessons
I hope you know what you’re doing…: I’m Legally Changing My Name to B-Phone.
Slate Magazine: What does KFC stand for now? by Seth Stevenson.
The Spec: Enuf is enuf. Enough is too much (originally from Associated Press).
Eddie Izzard: Being Bilingual (“Dress to Kill”).

Follow Friday #6: Josh Groban

On Follow Friday this week:
1. Introduction
2. Blog
3. Twitter
4. Drop Me a Line.

Okay, so I thought I would have done a political FF as my next move – but then I came across the front page of Twitter, revealing yet another laughable tweet from my favorite mainstream big shot proffessional scribbler, warbler, and ivory tickler all-in-one these days, Josh Groban (of course, my not-so-mainstream ditto is Anders Filipsen).

When it comes to blogging, Josh has a tendency to vlog when there are more than one thing to mention – and not only does he upload the video to his Vimeo vlog, but he adds it as a blogpost as well (thus I don’t add the link to his vlog around here, unless I have to link to a specific video (say, if I need to point out something about stocking up on canned goods – and you’ll only have to see the first 23 seconds to get it)).

You can find his blog at joshgrobanblog.tumblr.com.

And yes, you can also find him on Twitter. Go to @joshgroban to follow him.

Twitter topic for today…Intelligent Design Vs. Evolution. GO! <runs behind wall made of 140 bricks or less>
about 3 hours ago via web
Source: @joshgroban

Reactions? Suggestions? Requests? Comment/reply away!

RE-BLOG: The World Would Be a Better Place If… (via Quiet Rebellion. . .)

Wow. Yes. Wonderful – now I don’t have to spend x number of hours writing out the twin of this blogpost!

The World Would Be a Better Place If... We could just accept each other. If we could all just embrace the idea that we are the same in that we have differences, that we are unique individuals, each with something to share, then the world would be much better for it. Lack of acceptance and a refusal to embrace beliefs and lifestyles that are different than our own cause unnecessary pain and hurt in our society. Those that are different are ridiculed, sometimes causing them to hide their … Read More

via Quiet Rebellion. . .

Recipe: Vanilla cookies, v2

These are the cookies I brought for the rocktour with Brorson’s Church. I discovered too late that I used 350 g of butter instead of the 375 the original recipe called for – but it worked out perfectly in the end.

Vanilla wreaths/cookies can turn out to the dry side (as small cookies usually do) – but to me, there’s not much in the world of cookies that can’t be cured by being dipped in a cuppa tea or coffee (or whatever wonderful, drinkable liquid you’ve got in front of you).

The original recipe calls for hazelnuts or almonds – but since there was some experimenting with it even back then, I think it’s safe to make your own special tune and sing your own special song when it comes to kernels. (Edit: Experiment with the kernels of sunflower seeds turned out successfully).

Ingredients
550 g flour
350 g butter
250 g cashew nuts
160 g light cane sugar
3 teaspoons (-ish) vanilla sugar
1 egg

To-do

  • Blend the cashews – whether they should be chunky or fine is up to you.
  • Mix the flour, blended almonds, cane sugar, and vanilla sugar.
  • Fold in the egg as well as possible – you can rub it in if you find it necessary, but be warned that it doesn’t assemble all of the dry goods.
  • Rub in the butter (by now it should start sticking).
  • To make the cookies, take a piece of dough, roll it into a ball with a diameter of 1-1½ cm, and press it flat.
  • To make the wreaths, you can either use a mincer or roll it into small sausages and shape the wreaths from that.
  • Bake in a preheated oven at 200º C (390º F) for 10-11 minutes.
  • Let them cool. Keep in airtight container (say, recycle an old ice cream container or somesuch).

The dough freezes well – so you can make “sausages”/“salamis” (app. 10 cm/4 inches in diameter) of leftover dough and freeze them. When you need more cookies, defrost a “salami” in the fridge overnight, cut it in slices (4-5 mm/one-fifth of an inch thick), and bake them according to the instructions above. If you are making the dough a day in advance, skip the freezing step, just pop it into the fridge.
Just remember that it’s easier to cut the dough straight from the fridge since the significant amount of butter in the dough does have a tendency to be a wee bit too far on the soft side if it isn’t cooled down first.

Enjoy!

Congratulations, Spain!

Although I’m siding with Denmark first, the Netherlands second, I still think it’ll be in the favor of Spain to win the World Cup.

Spain — you deserve it — enjoy you championship!

Follow Friday #5: David Letterman and Roskilde Festival

On Follow Friday this week:
1. Introduction
2. Twitter: The Late Show with David Letterman
3. Roskilde Festival
4. Drop Me a Line.

I was just watching Letterman, and although it’s usually only on a week’s delay, they had a rerun of an episode from March starring Jennifer Aniston. This episode contained a bit and a top 10 on Twitter – so I thought I would check up on it.

Secondly, the Roskilde Festival ended on Sunday – so Monday (or at least sometime this week) would actually have been the proper day/week to start stalking following their planning yet again.

I think there is no doubt that David Letterman wasn’t too into in Twitter to start with – but finally gave in – so now rumor has it that he’s occasionally gives it up on the Late Show’s Twitteraccount, @Late_show.

Here he is, giving it up for the first time:

The Roskilde Festival is well over this year – and for you who were in contact with me around this time know that I didn’t go, contrary to what I said earlier this year. Finances were in question – being a student saving for a trip to New Zealand really tightens up the personal economy.

But now that it’s over, it’s just about time to obsess about what’s going to happen next year.
First of all, you can sign up for the newsletter (which I did a few years back).
You can do this by registrating on their website – link to registration form – where you can opt in on both e-mail newsletter and text messages on your phone. And not to worry if you haven’t worked as a volunteer – this is also an option in the drop-down menu as I write.
Second of all, you can subscribe to the RSS newsfeed.
I found the link on the front page, but here’s the link directing you straight to the feed. You can also dive right into the news archives at the website (where I found the link for the newsletter).
Third of all, check out the blogs on the website! Übercool!
Last, but not least, check them out on Twitter. You can find the festival itself on @orangefeeling – and you can check out relevant posts by going for the keywords #RF10 and #RF11.

I think that this is just what I needed; an RF break. Before this year’s festival, my brain didn’t really find finances and heat compatible with how I felt – but after checking blogs and the comment from Reverend Asser Skude (yes, him again – he was there in his cassock and ruff, helping out Morgencafeen, speaking the case of the homeless and being otherwise Reverend-esque in that subtle, National Church kind of waygood one on ya, mate! (disclaimer: photos snatched from an article at Kristeligt-Dagblad.dk)), I can’t wait to get back in the filth there. I’ll keep you posted.

Reactions? Suggestions? Questions? Requests? Comment/reply away.

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